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Becky of the Sea

A marine biology student who loves all sorts of ocean-y wonderfulness
Sep 18 '14
were-all-strange:

Dubai’s Aquarium Tunnel

were-all-strange:

Dubai’s Aquarium Tunnel

Sep 18 '14
earthlynation:

The Winter Tempest — Rocky Mountains, CO (by Light of the Wild)

earthlynation:

The Winter Tempest — Rocky Mountains, CO (by Light of the Wild)

Sep 18 '14
natgeotravel:

Before dawn, a brilliant full moon illuminates the snowy landscape of Churchill, Manitoba, Canada, home to an arctic fox.
Photograph by Norbert Rosing, National Geographic

natgeotravel:

Before dawn, a brilliant full moon illuminates the snowy landscape of Churchill, Manitoba, Canada, home to an arctic fox.

Photograph by Norbert Rosing, National Geographic

Sep 17 '14
Sep 17 '14
Sep 17 '14
mad-as-a-marine-biologist:

thatfishkid:

A slender mola washed up at the research station that I worked at this summer. These fish are gorgeous and are a pelagic fish that rarely come up into our temperate waters. This is another sure sign of an El Niño year here in California

They grow to about a meter which is nothing compared to some of the other members of the molidae family. 
This big guy is a Mola mola, also known as an ocean sunfish and they grow to weights over 1000kg! 

That is a gorgeous fish.

mad-as-a-marine-biologist:

thatfishkid:

A slender mola washed up at the research station that I worked at this summer. These fish are gorgeous and are a pelagic fish that rarely come up into our temperate waters. This is another sure sign of an El Niño year here in California

They grow to about a meter which is nothing compared to some of the other members of the molidae family. 

This big guy is a Mola mola, also known as an ocean sunfish and they grow to weights over 1000kg! 

That is a gorgeous fish.

Sep 16 '14

sprinkleofglitr:

susemoji:

new hat

She’s still got it. 

(Source: poyzn)

Sep 16 '14
libutron:

Scarlet Macaw’s feathers: a priceless source of genetic and ecological information
The molted feathers from scarlet macaws, Ara macao (Psittacidae), are sources of small amounts of DNA, so George Olah, a biologist from the Australian National University, is using DNA markers to monitor wildlife populations of this splendid bird in the area of potential impact of the massive road that in 2011 connected the ports of Brazil to the shipping docks of Peru.
For Olah, insights into his macaw study population are hidden in the colorful feathers the macaws left behind. Olah and his colleagues extract that genetic material, and then amplify it. Each DNA sample from a feather contains a genetic tag unique to the bird from which the feather came.
By collecting feathers and sequencing their DNA, the researchers can build a picture of individual birds’ movements through their habitat. Finding samples from the same individuals or families in the landscape can tell researchers where these birds move, how far from their nests they fly, or where evidence of their presence can’t be found.
Reference: [1]
Photo credit: ©Giovanni Mari | Locality: Tambopata National Reserve, Peru

libutron:

Scarlet Macaw’s feathers: a priceless source of genetic and ecological information

The molted feathers from scarlet macaws, Ara macao (Psittacidae), are sources of small amounts of DNA, so George Olah, a biologist from the Australian National University, is using DNA markers to monitor wildlife populations of this splendid bird in the area of potential impact of the massive road that in 2011 connected the ports of Brazil to the shipping docks of Peru.

For Olah, insights into his macaw study population are hidden in the colorful feathers the macaws left behind. Olah and his colleagues extract that genetic material, and then amplify it. Each DNA sample from a feather contains a genetic tag unique to the bird from which the feather came.

By collecting feathers and sequencing their DNA, the researchers can build a picture of individual birds’ movements through their habitat. Finding samples from the same individuals or families in the landscape can tell researchers where these birds move, how far from their nests they fly, or where evidence of their presence can’t be found.

Reference: [1]

Photo credit: ©Giovanni Mari | Locality: Tambopata National Reserve, Peru

Sep 16 '14
Sep 16 '14
this-is-wild:

tumblr_mv4xlwcZiz1qkfpxgo1_500 (by valerie.novello)

this-is-wild:

tumblr_mv4xlwcZiz1qkfpxgo1_500 (by valerie.novello)

Sep 15 '14

semperannoying:

A friendly walrus on a Russian submarine.

Sep 15 '14

nubbsgalore:

nicolas reusens photographs the hummingbirds who visit his backyard (see also: previous bird posts)

Sep 15 '14
Sep 14 '14
disminucion:

Shafts of Light, Dain Blair

disminucion:

Shafts of Light, Dain Blair

Sep 14 '14